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Update Friday 20th March:

We are now closed to all visitors and volunteers, except the family of those receiving End of Life Care. This policy of restricting volunteers and visitors is from, Friday 20th March. 

We are arranging devices to allow relatives and friends to contact our residents by Skype and other methods.  If you wish to arrange a call please call your Household. 

We thank you for your cooperation as we protect the safety and wellbeing of our residents in our care.

Our top priority is the safety and wellbeing of our residents and staff. We have therefore put in place robust and comprehensive contingency plans to prepare for, and respond to, the coronavirus outbreak in the UK. Our plans will be kept under regular review and updated as advised by the Public health authorities.

This page details the latest guidance from Nightingale Hammerson about the steps that we are taking at Nightingale House to prevent the spread of the virus. This information is intended for our Residents, Volunteers, Staff and any visitors to our home.

Prior to visiting the home.

We are asking visitors, including family members and friends to minimise visits to our care home until further notice order to keep your loved ones, and all our residents as safe as possible.  We have not taken this decision lightly, and appreciate that this may cause some discomfort, but feel it is a necessary step to take. 

We are requesting that you consider if you really need to visit.  We would be happy to help facilitate a facetime or skype call with your relative or friend – please ask staff if your loved one will need assistance.

Do not visit if you have travelled overseas in the last 14 days

Do not visit if you have are unwell or have any symptons of coronavirus – shortness of breath, cough or high temperature.

Do not visit if you have had contact in the last 14 days with anyone who is now in isolation or who has flu-like symptoms.

We are asking that each resident has no more than one visitor at a time. 

Please do not bring children to the home.  We have suspended the intergenerational programme at this time. 

We appreciate your support with these measures as we try to prevent the risk to our residents.  Please do check this guidance often as we may need to change this at short notice if the Government guidance changes. 

How to safely visit us.

We are restricting visitors to one per resident.  Please do not bring children.  It is important that you visit safely and in a way that minimises risk to residents and staff.

Please use the hand washing station on arrival.  We ask that you use soap and water and wash for at least 20 seconds following the guidance on the posters.  This is has been proven to be more effective than hand sanitiser and best way of protecting everyone including yourself. 

We also ask if you normally come by public transport you consider driving to us rather than using public transport.  We have some parking available and on street parking controls are only in force 10.30-11.30 on weekdays. 

Inside the home we ask that you consider reducing physical contact with residents (no hugging).  If you bring your own water bottle, you use a disposable plastic cup to fill it from our water machines.  When you are visiting the garden café you pay by contactless to avoid cross contamination. 

What steps are Nightingale Hammerson taking?

We are requesting that you consider if you really need to visit.  We would be happy to help facilitate a facetime or skype call with your relative or friend – please ask staff if your loved one will need assistance.

We have implemented our new visitor policy to ask you not to visit if;

You have travelled overseas in the last 14 days

You are unwell or have any symptons of coronavirus – shortness of breath, cough or high temperature.

You have had contact in the last 14 days with anyone who is now in isolation or who has flu-like symptoms.

We are asking that each resident has no more than one visitor at a time. 

Please do not bring children to the home.  We have suspended the intergenerational programme at this time. 

We also advise that anyone who comes into our home regularly washes their hands and uses the hand sanitiser upon entry to the building.

Our cleaning teams are being thorough and using all the recommended cleaning products to prevent the spread of the virus.

Our care staff have undergone additional specialist infection control training so that they are prepared in the event of an outbreak.

We have cancelled, postponed or relocated any large or non-critical gatherings in our care home

We will not be inviting families and visitors to this year’s Seder nights with the residents. 

We have postponed external trips for residents and have limited visiting acts to those with one or two performers.  We have cancelled external visitors and events which were coming in a group of more than 2 people. 

Is everything going to continue as usual and is it all safe?

The safety and wellbeing of those in our care are our priority, and Nightingale House will continue to do all we can to keep our residents, families, staff and volunteers as safe as possible from the virus. We have suspended the intergenerational programme until the issue is over. We are continuing with most of our normal activity programmes and some events for the residents.

How often is Nightingale Hammerson reviewing the situation?

Nightingale Hammerson will continue to be led by advice given by Public Health England, the UK government, the World Health Organisation and other public health bodies. We are currently readying ourselves with contingency plans for various scenarios that may happen as a result of coronavirus nationally or in our home.

Nightingale House is continuously reviewing the situation and the leadership team are convening weekly to review the situation, along with our measures and plans to ensure that all questions can be answered as far as possible. Everyone is clear on what we will need to do in a range of different situations. If anything changes that affect you directly, we will contact you.

Does Nightingale House have enough food, medicine and cleaning products in the event of any national shortages?

Nightingale House is confident that we have and will continue to have enough food, medicine, and cleaning supplies to meet the needs of our resources, even in the event of a national shortage. The government are clear that they do not anticipate the need to panic buy or stock any more additional items than usually necessary.

What happens if someone with coronavirus comes into a Nightingale House?

If someone with coronavirus comes into Nightingale House, Public Health England will be contacted and we will then follow an established procedure, which will include a risk assessment and a deep-clean of the building. Regular visitors will be restricted during that time, and we will immediately update everyone with next steps as soon as we know the extent of the situation.

Do staff know what to do if they notice that someone has contracted coronavirus?

Staff in our care homes have undergone specialist infection control training, which means that they are well placed to deal with any possible outbreak of coronavirus. All Nightingale House staff have also received guidance on what to do if they notice that someone has possible symptoms of the virus.

Is the home going to have a deep clean?

Our home is undergoing deeper cleaning measures with more focus on areas with higher numbers of people congregating and in regular use, such as kitchens, communal spaces and entry point to the building, including handrails, door handles and lifts.

We are confident that our cleaning staff are using the necessary specified products to keep our resources as clean as possible. Nightingale House have provided additional hand sanitisers in the entrance and a handwashing station. A deep clean of the building will only be necessary if we know of or suspect that someone with coronavirus has entered the building. In this instance, we would contact Public Health England, who would carry out an assessment and deep cleaning of all necessary areas.

If the situation get worse, will all Nightingale House remain open and services continue to run?

Our home will remain open as our residents rely on us, so it is our priority to keep open, safe, and running as effectively as possible. We are currently looking at how we might prioritise what we do in our care home if we experience a shortage of staff. These decisions will be continuously under review and the potential for the need to run reduced services only occurring in the event of severe staff shortages in the possible height of coronavirus being classed as a global pandemic situation.

If volunteers feel generally unwell should they still not come in just in case?

Yes we are asking that Volunteers feel unwell that they do not come into Nightingale House. If you are unsure about whether you are fit to volunteer, you should, in the first instance, call the person responsible for the area you work in. We are asking befrienders not to come in for the moment.

What is coronavirus or COVID-19?

Novel coronavirus or COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It’s caused by a virus called coronavirus. As it is a new virus, the lack of immunity in the population (and the absence as yet of an effective vaccine) means that this coronavirus has the potential to spread extensively.

Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptoms of this coronavirus are fever, tiredness, and dry cough.

Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhoea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don’t feel unwell.

What should I do if I think I have or have come in to contact with someone who has/may have symptoms of coronavirus?

If you, or you think someone you know is affected by coronavirus, please call the NHS 111 phone service for further advice. You should not go to the GP, or A&E. You may be told to self-isolate. Public Health England advises people to take “common-sense” steps to avoid close contact with others.